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At Dallas Art Fair 2020, JDJ presents an intergenerational conversation between four artists whose work occupies the space between abstraction and figuration.

Mark Barrow & Sarah Parke
4.24-6.30, 2017
Acrylic on Hand-Loomed Linen
34 × 30 inches
$15,000

Mark Barrow & Sarah Parke
4.24-6.30, 2017 (detail)

Mark Barrow & Sarah Parke's collaborative art practice focuses on the process of weaving and its relationship to visual systems.

Mark Barrow & Sarah Parke
5.23-11.24 (Woman), 2017
Acrylic on Hand-Loomed Linen
46 × 42 inches
$20,000

Mark Barrow & Sarah Parke
5.23-11.24 (Woman), 2017 (angle)

Mark Barrow & Sarah Parke
5.23-11.24 (Woman), 2017 (detail)

Barrow & Parke are known for their intricate paintings on hand-woven linen.
The painted surfaces interact with the color, texture and pattern woven into the fabric.
Their work operates at the intersection of craft, technology and contemporary art.

Mark Barrow & Sarah Parke
Reweave 9, 2016
Hand dyed linen
20 × 16 inches
$8,000

Mark Barrow & Sarah Parke
10.17-12.11, 2015
Acrylic on Hand-Loomed Fabric
19 × 15 inches
$8,000

Mark Barrow & Sarah Parke
10.17-12.11, 2015 (detail)

Mark Barrow & Sarah Parke
Swipe 4, 2015
colored pencil on paper
31 × 21 ¼ inches
$2,500

Mark Barrow & Sarah Parke
12.6-2.22, 2016
Acrylic on Hand-Loomed Fabric
18 × 16 inches
$8,000

Mark Barrow & Sarah Parke
12.6-2.22, 2016 (detail)

Athena LaTocha's practice explores the relationship between natural and manmade landscapes.

Athena LaTocha
Thirteen Days, 2017-2019
ink and earth on paper
44 × 120 × 2 inches
$18,000

Athena LaTocha, Thirteen Days, 2017-2019 (detail)

LaTocha is inspired by her Native American heritage, her upbringing in Alaska, and Earthworks artists of the 1960s and 1970s.
The paintings are made from earth-toned inks, soil, and industrial solvents that she applies to the surface using tools such as tire shreds, scrap metal, and bricks.
The direct experience of wilderness, the untrampled landscape, and the unyielding power of nature is at the core of her practice.
She is also influenced by human intervention upon the earth—a reworking of the natural world, as can be found at quarries, gravel pits, and oil refineries.

Athena LaTocha
Untitled No. 22, 2015
Ink and shellac on paper
17 × 33 ¾ inches
$6,000

Athena LaTocha
Untitled No. 25, 2015
Sumi and walnut ink and shellac on
paper
18 × 43 ⅞ inches
$6,000

Athena LaTocha
Untitled, 2015-2016
Sumi and walnut ink and shellac on
paper
48 × 60 inches
$14,000

Zoe Avery Nelson's paintings capture a sense of movement and fluidity.

Zoe Avery Nelson
Elephant no. 3 (impossible reach), 2018
oil on canvas
48 × 46 inches
$8,000

Colors slide from one hue to another, and shapes shift from abstraction toward a sense of swirling figuration.
Much like their paintings, Nelson themself embodies a sense of fluidity.
The formal language embedded in the paintings visually traverses through their feeling of their non-binary gender identity.

Zoe Avery Nelson
I Dance in Acid Rain, 2020
Oil on canvas
72 × 54 inches
$10,000

Zoe Avery Nelson
Webb Dancing at Pano, 2019
Oil on canvas
20 × 16 inches
$2,500

Zoe Avery Nelson
Cosmic Pause, 2020
Oil on canvas
34 × 30 inches
$6,000

Zoe Avery Nelson
Green Raver, 2020
Oil on canvas
20 × 16 inches
$2,500

Zoe Avery Nelson
Body Building (shower scene), 2018
oil on canvas
48 × 42 inches
$8,000

Fascinated by sequential moments in time, Susan Weil sets images in motion in unconventional ways.

Susan Weil
Color Configurations 2 (Red), 2000
Acrylic on paper
60 × 66 inches
$36,000

Susan Weil, Color Configurations 2 (red), 2000 (angle)

Susan Weil, Color Configurations 2 (red), 2000 (detail)

Weil came of age as an artist in the postwar period, studying under Josef Albers at Black Mountain College with Willem & Elaine de Kooning, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg & Cy Twombly.
Weil's Configurations series, made in the late 1980s and early 1990s, features female figures loosely drawn in different poses across a grid of smaller sheets of paper.
The repetition of form implies a sense of movement and gesture within the composition.
Weil's Soft Fold paintings are made from simple shapes that are painted on both sides and draped into spatial configurations.
The works on paper from 1971 made with spray paint have a fantastic tension between abstraction and figuration.

Susan Weil
Moon (Half Moon), 1990
Acrylic on canvas
40 × 21 inches
$20,500

Susan Weil, Moon (Half Moon), 1990 (angle view)

Susan Weil
Flower Folds, 1991
Acrylic on canvas
33 × 13 inches
$18,000

Susan Weil
Flower Folds, 1991
Acrylic on canvas
33 × 13 inches (angle)

Susan Weil
Black Configuration, 2000
Charcoal, watercolor, and acrylic on paper
60 × 66 inches
$36,000

Susan Weil, Black Configuration (detail)

Susan Weil
Untitled, c. 1971
Spray paint on paper
24 × 18 inches
$7,000

Susan Weil
Untitled, c. 1971
Spray paint on paper
24 × 18 inches
$7,000

Susan Weil
Untitled, c. 1971
Spray paint on paper
24 × 18 inches
$7,000

Susan Weil
Untitled, c. 1971
Spray paint on paper
24 × 18 inches
$7,000